Nordic polenta – rye porridge

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Whisk 300 ml flour into one litre of boiling water. Boil for a few minutes. Done!

In my attempts to have a healthier diet, and embracing all those healthy options that are specialities of my region, I got thinking of porridge. Nothing is more Olde Swedish Every Day Fare than vattgröt, which is porridge made of water and coarse-grain flour, preferably rye or oats. My grandfather had this for breakfast his entire life, and he became over 90 years old (he was a bit uninterested towards the end, perhaps). He would wake up before anybody else, and I sometimes woke earlier than I normally would on a holiday, just to have porridge with him. Often I would have breakfast with grandma, too, her home-made bread was another treat I did not want to miss!

20150625_150110It has been a while since I made porridge, I tend to eat one thing or another in periods of a few months. I prefer rye to oats, and like to make four portions at a time, frying my porridge three mornings out of four. Fried porridge is possibly even tastier. Serve it with apple sauce and cinnamon or jam, some put milk on top, but I like my milk in a glass if I’m having any.

Rye in general does good things for the digestion, and stabilizes one’s bloodsugar levels. It contains folic acid, iron, zinc, and calcium. It also makes you happy, clever, and beautiful. 😉

The porridge sets when cold, and is easy to cut up the day after.
The porridge sets when cold, and is easy to cut up the day after.
Fry to a golden brown on medium heat, in real butter, of course.
Fry to a golden brown on medium heat, in real butter, of course.

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6 thoughts on “Nordic polenta – rye porridge”

  1. Good to know a possible secret. I suppose the flour makes a difference also. We can get it in many different forms from really well ground to with more fiber left in it. I prefer the latter but have yet to perfect making bread from it!

    1. That is true. Just like meat is cut differently in different cultures, grain is also ground differently, depending on what the local cooking traditions require. I know some expats mix different kinds of flour to get the right consistency.

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