Salisbury Cathedral

IMGP0212I had long been wanting to visit Salisbury. This was a very good year to do so, with the 800 year celebrations of the Magna Charta; Salisbury Cathedral is in possession of one of the four original documents, which was a treat to see! The cathedral build was begun in 1220, and I guess a cathedral is never really finished; much work has been made on the tower as late as the 1990´s. We had to go up there, naturally, where one could see far and wide. They have an amazing website, in case you are interested.

Salisbury Cathedral has the largest and most open close of all cathedrals in England -or so we were told. Certainly, it was impossible to get as good a view of the cathedral in York, with the town right next to it.
Salisbury Cathedral has the largest and most open close of all cathedrals in England – or so we were told. Certainly, it was impossible to get as good a view of the cathedral in York, with the town right next to it. This is one of the entrances.
The large, beautiful lawn has lots of artwork on display.
The large, beautiful lawn has lots of artwork on display.

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There were lots of graffiti, old and new.
There were lots of graffiti, old and new.

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All the faces are unique. Who were these people?
There were generations of reinforcements in the tower, it was pretty easy to see where the Victorians had been at it, with huge iron bars.
There were generations of reinforcements in the tower; it was pretty easy to see where the Victorians had been at it, with huge iron bars.
Compared to other old towers we have climbed, the stairs were comfortable and new. No old, narrow stone stairways!
Compared to other old towers we have climbed, the stairs were comfortable and new. No old, narrow stone stairways!
Lots of steeplejacks have made their marks on the walls of the tower.
Lots of steeplejacks have made their marks on the walls of the tower.
These are some of the names of people who contributed with funds to save the tower, at one time at considerable risk of collapsing.
These are some of the names of people who contributed with funds to save the tower, at one time at considerable risk of collapsing.

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Some of the logs in this building are over 1000 years old!
Some of the logs in this building are over 1000 years old!
The view north.
The view north.
In front of the café, you can see the marks in the ground where the old belltower used to stand; it was demolished in the 18th Century.
In front of the café, you can see the marks in the ground where the old belltower used to stand; it was demolished in the 18th Century.

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Far away, one could even see Old Sarum, where the first cathedral stood. I´ll show you in a later post.
Far away, one could even see Old Sarum, where the first cathedral stood. I´ll show you in a later post.
We were not allowed out in one direction because peregrine falcons were nesting there. I was lucky enough to get a snap!
We were not allowed out in one direction because peregrine falcons were nesting there. I was lucky enough to get a snap!

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I can get quite entranced by details like this.
I can get quite entranced by details like this.
This figure seemed quite modern to me.
This figure seemed quite modern to me.
Another shot of the falcon from the ground.
Another shot of the falcon from the ground.
And the entire (well most of it) cathedral from below. A truly amazing place.
And the entire (well most of it) cathedral from below. A truly amazing place.
And the husband´s 180 degree view of the chapter house, where the Magna Charta was on display in the little tent. You can see me on the far right.... and if you click on the photo, you can see it in more detail.
And the husband´s 180 degree view of the chapter house, where the Magna Charta was on display in the little tent. You can see me on the far right…. and if you click on the photo, you can see it in more detail.

I confess, there is much, much more to this place that I just can´t show without becoming very, very tedious: a fabulous café inside the cathedral as well as one outside in the close, a fascinating old clock (that does not show the time, oddly enough), cloisters, artworks, and so many things we didn´t even have time to see. If you ever go to England, forget London, spend a few days in Salisbury instead…

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4 thoughts on “Salisbury Cathedral”

    1. It’s an odd feeling to stand there and look at what is, in a sense, just a very old document. The experience is a layered one and brings to mind all I have read about the king in question (John Lackland), his father, mother, brothers, and their goings on, queerer than any television soap… 😉 I love history!

  1. I had to come back to see this post that I somehow missed. I am in AWE, and really love all the photos, especially the one your husband took of the Magna Charta and YOU.

    The statues you mentioned that looked modern made me think they were made in very different eras and styles. So glad you shared this, because I adore seeing the Salisbury Cathedral and all the history of England after I created that Kings and Queens AB earlier this year. It brought a lot into perspective, too.

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